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The history of kindness...

What is the history of kindness?

So I wondered, as I read over the many inspiring comments that I received for my birthday. (Thank you, by the way!)

In terms of "random acts of kindness," Google had an answer ready and waiting for me. It would appear that a woman in Sausalito, CA wrote the following on a placemat, in 1982:

Practice random acts of kindness and senseless acts of beauty.

From this humble origin, the quote entered the world and spread in newspaper articles, bumper stickers, and other analog media. Possibly it's the first meme to be generated from a placemat?

I don't believe that either the concept of "kindness" or "random acts" of it only began in 1982, by the way. It's just funny how the internet has answers to these specific types of questions.

Challenge for the day: can you smile at three* strangers? Especially difficult if you normally maintain an expressionless mask as you move about your day (or if you think you're maintaining an expressionless mask).

  • Step 1: Be aware of the people you pass. 
  • Step 2: See if you can tell what your expression actually is. 
  • Step 3: Smile. 
  • Step 4: See what happens. Do they smile back? Or maybe nothing happens? Or maybe your own mood is suddenly lifted, just a little bit?

Next time, more on the history of kindness, and other related matters!

*bonus points: smile at more than three!

~~

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Comments

Unknown said…
Yes.It does happen sometimes.Just ignore

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